Hip Arthroscopy and the Crazy, Complicated Joint for Walking.


Some Background

The hip joint is built for stability during weight bearing activities such as walking, running, getting out of a chair, ascending and descending stairs and squatting to the floor to pick something up. The bony geometry of the hip reveals a deep socket (acetabulum) surrounding the ball (head) of the thigh bone (femur). The acetabulum and the femoral head are covered with cartilage. The angle of the shaft of the femur relative to the head, the amount of rotation in the shaft of the femur (torsion) and the depth of the acetabulum has an impact on the biomechanics of the joint and, if abnormal, the need for hip arthroscopy. Measurement of these angles by the physical therapist and the orthopedic surgeon in addition to performing special testing to stress structures of the hip helps in developing a clinical picture in the presence of hip pain.

(From Wikidoc.org)

A cartilaginous structure surrounding the acetabulum, the acetabular labrum, can become torn due to degenerative processes or through trauma.

Surrounding and encasing the joint is the capsule which includes strong ligaments (capsuloligamentous complex). This structure gives additional stability to the joint during movement. These stabilizing structures include the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral and pubofemoral ligaments. Together with the ball and socket bony structure, the strength of these ligaments makes it hard to dislocate a normal hip – thank our lucky stars!

Hip Ligaments.jpg

(From http://www.medillsb.com)

Muscles, attached from the pelvis to the femur, create movement and stability during weight bearing on the limb. The primary movers of the hip joint are the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas and the various adductor muscles. In addition, there are the quadriceps (front of the thigh), particularly the rectus femoris, and the hamstrings (back of the thigh) to consider as well as the hip rotators, situated deep to the gluteus musculature.

To the left you seethe outer hip muscles. Peel them away and you reach the deeper muscles, as seen in the image immediately above. So, based on the complex muscular anatomy, and how important these muscles are in normal walking, as well as all other weight bearing function, be skeptical of healthcare providers who feel no physical therapy is needed after some kind of surgery. You must retrain the muscles to work correctly.

Important biomechanics

Consider this. Each time we transfer weight onto one of our legs, the hip abductors (gluteus medius) must contract to stabilize the pelvis (not permit it to sag on the non-weight bearing side). The importance of this from a rehabilitation standpoint is that the physical therapist will focus a great deal of attention on maximizing the functional strength of this muscle, it being so vital in recovery of a normal gait pattern.

Trendelenberg gait

(Picture from the Oregon Exercise Therapy Blog)

Here is a video of the abnormal gait pattern seen due to weak hip abductors – a Trendelenberg Gait.

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is commonly used to address acetabular labral tears and femoroacetabular impingement as well as capsular repair. It may also be used to remove any chondral flaps due to arthritis within the joint. During an arthroscopy the surgeon may also perform a soft tissue release to alleviate muscle pain due to tendons or parts of a muscle rubbing on a bony prominence.

In a future post, I hope to convince one of the orthopedic surgeons, who specializes in hip arthroscopy, to detail his thoughts on the indications for hip arthroscopy. Maybe he can also give some insight into why he feels physical therapy is beneficial following such a surgery.

Your Call to Action

If you walk with a limp without pain and feel off balance or are concerned your leg will give way on you, it may be that you need very specific strengthening exercises to correct your gait and prevent falling. After all, if you prevent falls, by strengthening supplemented by specific fall prevention training, you avoiding impact in hitting the ground, i.e. falls, and thus you avoid more severe injuries such as fractures.

Call a physical therapist and get in for an evaluation and a suitable exercise/balance program. You will be glad you did!

Yes! Research shows physical therapy reduces opioid use.


Physical therapy continues to gain support, through published research, for its roll in reducing the epidemic of opioid dependency. Early intervention for low back pain has been shown to be highly effective in reducing the pain and thus improving function as well as significantly reducing opioid use.

if you have low back pain give us a call at Custom Physical Therapy in Sparks, South Reno or Northwest Reno. Or swing by to chat with one of our phenomenal physical therapists.

ask your physician to send you for physical therapy before they prescribe opioids. We can help you!

Here is the info from the American Physical Therapy Association. Check it out

Source: http://www.apta.org/PTinMotion/News/2018/12/14/JAMAEarlyPTOpioids/?_zs=i8CfV1&_zl=AG1P5

Awesome video: Ankle Pain, Popping and Tendinitis.


(Cool 11 second video to watch!)

The fibula and tibia of the lower leg join the talus, one of the 26 bones in the foot, to create the ankle joint. There are, therefore, many places to experience ankle pain, foot pain as well as popping during our daily functional activities such as walking or running. Add in all the tendons which cross the front of the ankle, the well known Achilles tendon at the back of the ankle and the two peroneal tendons passing immediately below the lateral maleolus (outer ankle bone) as well as the tibialis posterior and flexor tendons of the toes passing around the bottom of the medial maleolus (inner ankle bone) and we now have possibilities of a tendinitis and tendon tears.

Today at our Custom Physical Therapy clinic in Sparks we had a fantastic example of peroneal tendon subluxation (popping over the lateral maleolus) and the patient permitted us to video it. Clearly we had fun watching the peroneal tendon popping over the lateral maleolus! Check it out here!

In this case it was not painful but you could see how it may result in tendinitis (inflammation of the tendon) if it the popping continues.

If you have concerns about foot or ankle pain, feel free to call us (775-331-1199) or, better yet, swing by any of our three Custom Physical Therapy clinics (Sparks, South Reno or Northwest Reno) to ask one of our 9 physical therapists to take a quick look and give you some advice.

Custom Physical Therapy looking for a Physical Therapist.


Custom Physical Therapy is seeking an outdoorsy, mountain biking, hiking, Lake Tahoe loving, skiing, camping, life loving outpatient orthopedic physical therapist to join us in Reno, Nevada.


We love what we do and are expanding because of the experiences our patients have and the absolutely amazing people who work at Custom Physical Therapy. Yes, I am biased but it’s totally true.


If you are a PT or know of someone who is a PT or a new grad and may be interested in working with us, contact me at (775) 813-2332 or ameintjes@usphclinic.com.

I’d love to chat with you.

André

(Aka owner/physical therapist/chief goofball)

“Is this a model or is it the real thing?”


I had the pleasure of meeting with one of our local orthopedic surgeons, Dr. Benjamin Bjerke, and the Zimmer-Biomet rep, Christina Escobar, to talk Mobi-C Disc Replacement technology and surgical technique developed by Zimmer-Biomet. Incredibly interesting.

Seeing the prosthesis, my first question was, “Is this a model or the real thing you are showing me?” It was much smaller than I anticipated!

Mobi-C_neck image_9-2016.pngMobi-C_hand-image_1_2016.png

Secondly, I found the specificity of the patient suitable for this intervention impressive – someone with neck pain and or radiculopathy (pain down the arm originating from nerve root compression in the neck) without much cervical spondylosis (degeneration of the discs and joints in the neck) and good vertebral alignment. The Mobi-C can replace discs at one or two levels of the cervical spine between the third and seventh cervical vertebrae.

So lets take a look in more detail.

Anatomy and Pathology of the Neck

  • The cervical spine has discs between each bone that provide cushioning for movements and body loads. The discs and bones in a healthy neck allow bending from side-to-side and front-to-back, and turning left-to-right. Disc problems can start from over-use, an accident, or just the wear and tear of daily life.  When a disc degenerates it becomes thinner and provides less padding to absorb movement.  Degenerated discs can also bulge (herniate) and pinch the spinal cord or nerves, which causes loss of feeling, weakness, pain, or tingling down the arms and hands. Below  you can see the normal cervical spine anatomy and adjacent is a graphic of what a spine with pathology may look like:

1.jpg2.jpg

Treatment Options

  • Before artificial discs were available, patients would traditionally receive an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion procedure to alleviate the pain from a herniated disc. In a fusion surgery, the disc is removed and either a bone spacer or a plastic implant is placed in the disc space to restore disc height and remove pressure on the pinched nerves or spinal cord.   A metal plate and screws is placed on the front of the vertebral column to hold the implant in place.  The result – a segment that no longer moves, or is “fused”.  The potential downside of a fusion procedure, in addition to the loss of motion, is that it can create additional stress on the spinal levels above and below it.  This can cause degeneration at those levels and potentially result in another future surgery.
  • An artificial disc like Mobi-C is an option instead of a fusion that will also be placed inside the disc space to restore height and remove pressure on the pinched nerves. However, the Mobi-C device is designed to allow the neck to maintain normal motion and thus limit adjacent levels from degenerating, possibly preventing future surgeries.

Image_40a_v02_2016.pngImage_61b_20pct_2016.png

 

Since Mobi-C cervical disc replacements are preferred over fusions because they preserve movement in the spine, lets take a look at this video to see what happens in the spine when a patient with the Mob- C implanted flexes and extends his/her neck versus a two level fusion:

Cervical disc replacement procedures are anticipated to experience rapid growth in the near future, due to multiple factors:

  • A growing library of clinical evidence demonstrating the long term safety and efficacy of cervical disc replacement.
  • Cervical disc replacement is being shown as a superior treatment to fusion for use at two cervical levels.
  • Better outcomes of cervical disc replacement over fusion such as reduced re-operation rates, reduced adjacent segment degeneration rates and surgeries, as well as a faster return to work.
  • Most patients return to work within six weeks of surgery. In the U.S. Mobi-C clinical trial, the return to work time was 20.9 days shorter for Mobi-C patients compared to fusion patients for two-level surgery and 7.5 days shorter for Mobi-C patients compared to fusion for one-level surgery.

What about physical therapy after the Mobi-C disc replacement?

  • Wear a neck collar to lessen neck movement for around a week after the surgery.
  • Avoid heavy lifting, repetitive bending, and prolonged or strenuous activity for up to 6 weeks after surgery.
  • When your surgeon releases you to start physical therapy the physical therapist will do a comprehensive evaluation to assess your cervical, scapular and shoulder range of motion as well as cervical, arm and trunk strength. Based on the data collected, you will be given specific exercises to address any deficits to ultimately improve your function. You may start of with cervical isometrics and progress to upper thoracic and arm strengthening exercises as well as neuromuscular reeducation of the deep neck muscles. The physical therapist will also utilize soft tissue mobilization techniques to limit scar formation and address any myofascial pain and muscle trigger points, present from inactivity. You will need to participate fully by being totally compliant with the home exercise program you are given by the physical therapist at your very first visit.

Successful outcomes are determined by multiple factors which include choosing the right surgical procedure done by a skilled surgeon, following post operative activity limitations and brace use as well as being totally compliant with physical therapy instructions and exercises. It is a 3 person team that makes your recovery work: you (and your home supporters), the surgeon (and their staff) and the physical therapist (and their clinical team members).

Thank you to Zimmer-Biomet for help with supplying me with information and photographs.

The Custom Physical Therapy Challenge Rules


If you dare ….. get fitter, stronger and healthier with the monthly Custom Physical Therapy Challenge.

Every month we will have a daily series of exercises to do for anyone and all who would like to join us. Employees, friends and family may join in.

Here are the rules:

  1. You complete all repetitions of each exercise every day and check it off the schedule of exercises.
  2. If you miss a day you may double up the next day – not advisable particularly towards the end of the series.
  3. It is purely the honor system.
  4. If you complete all exercises for the entire month you let us know by faxing the checked schedule to Custom Physical Therapy (775-331-1180) or emailing it to us with your name on it and contact number: customptchallenge@gmail.com
  5. Prize: $50-$75 gift certificate from a local business (Previously: Great Full Gardens Restaurant, 1 hour massage).

Exercise technique can be seen on our Youtube Custom Physical Therapy Challenge Channel. Here is the URL:

Let us know how you like it and what you would like to challenge in future months. For example, an arm challenge, butt challenge, core challenge, chest challenge, aerobic challenge, rope jump challenge.

If you have any concerns about doing the exercises and need help modifying them feel free to call us at the Sparks location: 775-331-1199. You can also email us with questions: customptchallenge@gmail.com

Have fun, be safe and get strong!

The Custom Physical Therapy Challenge Department

www.custom-pt.com

http://www.customphysicaltherapy.wordpress.com/

Reasons to Choose Custom Physical Therapy


Swelling and Knee Function


The most read post on this blog deals with “Swelling, Effusion, Edema and Bruising – What’s the difference?”.  I will take the concept one step further and discuss how knee swelling or joint effusions impact your ability to control your knee extension when you walk.

So, you injure your knee and develop swelling inside the joint.  You may notice your knee giving way.  That means when you transfer weight onto your injured leg the knee buckles.  This is due to the quadriceps (front of your thigh) not contracting efficiently and hence not controlling the knee in extension.  Knee extension is vital in walking because it stabilizes the leg to accept the transferred weight from the opposite leg when you are in stance phase of gait.  If the knee is unable to go fully straight while stepping onto it you have difficulty swinging the other leg through to take another step.

This happens because of the swelling (and possibly pain too) within the joint.  A neural reflex is set up by distension of the joint structures.  It passes through the spinal cord and back to inhibit the quadriceps.  It is then difficult to contract them at the right time and with sufficient speed during the gait cycle.  Hence, unsafe walking and difficulty going up and down stairs, for example.  You may notice immediate deterioration of your ability to contract the quadriceps following injury with a joint effusion.

To regain quadriceps function and hence to restore normal and safe walking you must control the swelling (see earlier post on this topic), avoid increasing it by careful activity modification and do specific exercises to regain normal quadriceps function.  Physical therapists will instruct you in specific neuromuscular reeducation exercises to restore the quadriceps recruitment pattern.  Such exercises may include seated quad sets, straight leg raises or short arc quad recruitment.  These may be done with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (not TENS – that’s for pain and totally different type of current form) to facilitate recruitment of the muscle.  In addition, you will be given terminal knee extension exercises in standing such as straightening the knee against a wall with a towel roll behind your knee against the wall or fully extending your knee against tension created by an elastic sports cord.

So, controlling swelling in a joint is necessary to regain function of the muscles moving that joint.  This process is used in all knee injuries that result in joint effusions as well as in all postoperative rehabilitation, for example, following ACL reconstruction, meniscus repairs and debridement as well as total knee replacements.

What have you found helpful in the past?

What worked for you?  What didn’t?

Post your comments here so other people can learn from your experiences.  We would love to here from you.

Hip pain – 21 months to diagnosis?


A study by Burnett et al in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (2006) documented an average time from injury to accurate diagnosis for hip pain due to labral tears as 21 months.  People with this type of hip pain saw an average of 3.3 providers before definitive treatment was initiaited.  In 17% of their study group of 66 patients, surgery was recommended on a different anatomic site.  Once the correct diagnosis was made and the hip arthroscopy was performed, 89% of the patients were clinically better off than before surgery.  That is positive.

Hip pain can originate from a number of structures and as a result can be easily misdiagnosed.  Low back pain can refer pain to the hip area.  Sacroiliac joint dysfunction can too.  Hip pain can be due to bony problems such as impingement or due to damage to the cartilage structure around the socket, that is the labrum (similar to the shoulder – see an earlier post on this blog).  It can originate from strain or tearing of the lignaments around the hip joint as well as from all the many muscles which control the hip joint.  In addition, pain may originate from the pubic area where the abdominal muscles and the hip adductors attach, commonly called athletic pubalgia or a sports hernia.  Finally, hip pain can be a consequence of referred pain from the leg.

Hip pain is typically localized to the groin area.  It may also be felt laterally over the outside of the hip or in the buttock.  There may be clicking, popping and snapping in the hip joint associated with the pain.  Walking, running, ascending and descending stairs, putting shoes on (figure 4 sitting) and lying on the affected side may be challenging.

Your to do list:

  1. If you have back pain that radiates to the hip area (buttock, side of your leg, groin) ask your doctor or physical therapist to evaluate the hip.  At Custom Physical Therapy we check the hip with every low back pain patient so we do not miss the diagnosis.
  2. Educate yourself on the hip so you can ask questions of your doctor and physical therapist.  Do not let your hip pain get misdiagnosed and take 21 months to be correctly treated.
  3. Call us at Custom Physical Therapy if you have any questions regarding your hip pain.  Mention you are calling with specific questions regarding this post on hip pain.  We can answer your questions.
  4. There are some really top notch hip doctors in Reno, Nevada.  Call us if you want to know who they are.
  5. Please forward this on to your friends, family and coworkers via email, Facebook, Twitter or word of mouth.

Thank you for being part of Custom Physical Therapy.  Here’s to your healthy hips!

Physical therapy

Knee Pain! Osteoarthritis!


To my fellow Boomers out there ….. How are your knees doing?  We are an active sector of the population and we want to remain that way for the health benefits (and the fun!) thereof.  Knee pain due to osteoarthritis, whether one or both knees, has a dramatic impact on a person’s ability to continue with their chosen active lifestyle and, if it gets painful enough, may impact activities of daily living such as getting into and out of a car or a chair, cooking a meal or simply walking.

 WHY KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS?

Osteoarthritis affects 25 million North Americans and is symptomatic in 13% of people aged 55 years and older.  It has been shown to be the most frequent cause of functional disability including being dependent on alternative forms of mobility due to the tremendous pain with walking.  Ouch!  The prevalence of osteoarthritis is rapidly increasing due to two main factors.  Firstly, the aging of the American population (that includes us!) is increasing the share numbers of people older than 55 years.  Secondly, the rapidly increasing obesity in our population is increasing the rate of joint degeneration.  One study reported 83% of males who had knee osteoarthritis were obese compared to 42% of males without it.  Wow!  Now there is a statistic that says a lot and leaves nothing to the imagination as to what we need to do to address the issue.

WHAT IS IT?

Osteoarthritis is the joints response to structural damage caused by mechanical problems.  It is the body’s attempt to repair a joint under unusual stress and often leads to a stable, pain free joint.  If this process fails (is insufficient for the magnitude of mechanical stress placed on the joint) the knee becomes symptomatic and hence functionally debilitating.

MECHANICAL STRESS YOU SAY?

Pathological mechanical stress of the knee joint may be due to:

  1. Increased overall load through the weight bearing joint surfaces (e.g. obesity).
  2. Reduced load bearing surface area thereby increasing the pressure (same force through a smaller area) exerted through the joint (e.g. misaligned joint: bandy or bow-legged).
  3. Repetitive impulsive loading of the joint (e.g. trauma, doing moguls).

Obesity increases the overall load through the joint and overwhelms the joint tissues resulting in osteoarthritis.  Being bandy or bow-legged reduces the weight bearing surface area in the knee joints (shifts it from throughout the knee to one side or the other of the joint) and results in excessive wear and tear of the joint on the outer or inner surfaces respectively.  Sustaining a serious injury to the knee in which ligaments are torn and the joint surfaces are banged together in the injury may initiate the osteoarthritic “repair” process as well.  Thus, when stress on the joint tissues exceeds their physiological tolerance breakdown ensues and osteoarthritis begins.

HOW CAN WE ADDRESS THE CAUSATIVE FACTORS?

Weight loss in an effort to attain a normal body weight for your frame is paramount in reducing the forces through the knees.  Walking results in a force through the knee equal to 3 – 4 times your body weight each step.  If you lose 20 – 50 pounds in an effort to attain your normal weight, you reduce the forces through your knees by 80 – 200 pounds each step you take!  Talk about happier knees!  An 11.2 pound weight loss over a 10 year period has been shown to reduce the likelihood of developing knee osteoarthritis by 50%.

For misaligned knee joints (those of you who are bandy or bow-legged) there are unloading braces to modify (increase) the load bearing surface and hence reduce stress to the one side of the affected knee.

In all osteoarthritic knee joints muscle weakness, joint stiffness and poor balance are factors.  Muscles around the knee joint serve to cause movement in bending and straightening the knee, can reduce mechanical stresses to the joint by absorbing loads applied to the limb (e.g. cushioning during landing a jump or when skiing) and stabilize the knee joint during daily tasks of walking, running, lifting and carrying to name a few.  Patients with knee osteoarthritis are 20% to 40% weaker in their quadriceps than people without the condition.  As the disease worsens the knee muscle activation patterns become less efficient and less specific and joint proprioception (the brain’s ability to know what is happening at the joint and react accordingly) is suppressed.  A well constructed, evidence-based physical therapy program will improve strength, range of motion and proprioception and result in improvements in physical function, pain and quality of life.  Modifying the mechanical problems causing the osteoarthritis together with addressing the inflammatory and pain aspects of the disease process through pharmacological intervention from your physician can result in an 86% success rate in improving your function.  Who would not like that!?

All our physical therapists at Custom Physical Therapy have undergone specialized training for treating osteoarthritis.  The therapists work as part of a team comprised of you the patient, your physician and the physical therapist.  Using physical therapy interventions to modify the mechanical factors impacting the progression of osteoarthritis together with the physician addressing the pharmacological aspects and the patient being compliant with an exercise and stretching program (see our very first post on this blog) as well as brace use, if prescribed, the team of patient-physical therapist-doctor minimizes the effect of the disease process on your function.

YOUR CALL TO ACTION!

  1. If you are overweight start a simple lifestyle change that entails weight loss (Call Joe Dibble, dietician at Sierra      Strength and Speed, for a consult.  He is really knowledgeable and practical.)
  2. Call Custom Physical Therapy so we can evaluate your      arthritic knees and set you up with appropriate treatment.
  3. Forward this post to someone you know who has sore      knees or you think may be interested in the information.

You are encouraged to call Custom Physical Therapy to talk to one of our accredited physical therapists about your knee pain.  You may be a candidate for this customized evidence-based program specifically developed to improve your function which deteriorated due to knee osteoarthritis.