Battling El Nino with Your Core in 10 minutes.


El Nino is arriving with massive amounts of snow and rain, right? We all hope for drought relief but with the forecasted “big winter” comes the need for strength and control of your hidden muscles to weather (pun intended) the wet, cold, white, slippery Reno-Sparks-Lake Tahoe area.

A generally accepted definition of “the core” is the muscles from below the neck and above the upper thigh (shoulders to hips). The importance of these muscles is in injury prevention, maintaining erect, “regal” posture and providing a base for functional strength (the ability to push a heavy door open, get in and out of a car, stand up out of a chair or lift a box form the floor to a counter). Training all the core would take all day if you try to isolate each muscle individually. So, do 3 exercises and get nearly all of them done in less than 10 minutes!

“YTWL” – shoulder and back muscles.

Keeping your body straight over a therapy ball beneath your lower abdominal-pelvic area and feet against the wall, raise your arms in 4 different planes noted by “YTWL”. Arms overhead at a 45° angle between head and shoulders, in line with shoulders, elbows tucked into your sides flexed 90°, and finally rotation of shoulders up with upper arms at shoulder level. No therapy ball? Just do it off the corner of your bed.

The Y of the YTWL Series

The Y of the YTWL Series (see YouTube channel for video)

Front Plank – abdominals, butt and shoulder.

Lying prone, support your body in a straight line from shoulders to ankles resting on your elbows and toes. Pull your navel in and up (“make yourself skinny”) and pinch your glutes together while rounding out your shoulders. Hold this position for up to a minute (must have perfect technique the entire hold). Repeat three to five times.

Front plank

Front plank (see YouTube channel for video)

Clamshell Progression – Hip muscles.

Lay on your side, knees bent to 90° and hips at 45°, one leg atop the other. Rotate your hip out by lifting your top knee while keeping feet together, 10 times. Rotate foot up keeping thighs together 10 times. Lift top leg parallel to bottom and rotate 10 times around the axis of the femur. Straighten your hip, keeping knee at 90° and rotate 10 times around the femurs axis. Tough people, repeat 3 times on each side.

Clamshell # 4

Clamshell # 4 (see YouTube channel for video)

To see a video of each exercise on our YouTube channel, go to The El Nino Core Program .

El Nino dump your snow, your rain and whatever icy weather you care to bring us. Our core is now ready for shoveling snow, lifting and carrying sand bags (hope not!) and preventing falls when slipping on ice. Bring on those pressure changes that make my back ache – El Nino we got the work done before you came!. See you when you arrive, that’s if you don’t chicken out again!

Antibiotic treatment of Low Back Pain


I recently came across an interesting pair of research papers in which low back pain was treated with antibiotics successfully.  This research is published in the European Spine Journal April 2013, volume 22, Issue 4, pages 690-696 and 697-707.

This concept took me by surprise.  Dic herniations can apparently become infected with the bacteria from plaque in your teeth and from acne.  The link between dental hygene and cardiovascular disease, and I think diabetes (not sure), has previously been documented so I do not think this premise is a far stretch.  The authors investigated nuclear disc material from patients who underwent surgery for annular tears and removal of visible nuclear tissue.  43% of patients had evidence of infections.

They then treated patients with chronic low back pain and vertebral bone edema with antibiotics for 100 days (that’s a long time).  The antibiotic treatment significantly improved the chronic low back pain when compared to placebo.

Well!  I am somewhat taken aback but realize this is very interesting and may explain some cases of low back pain that do not progress as well as they should.

Your call to Action:

  1. What do you think of this?
  2. If you are a healthcare provider, post your comments please.
  3. Forward this onto someone who may have some comments and have them post their thoughts to our blog.
  4. Have an incredible week!

Hip pain – 21 months to diagnosis?


A study by Burnett et al in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (2006) documented an average time from injury to accurate diagnosis for hip pain due to labral tears as 21 months.  People with this type of hip pain saw an average of 3.3 providers before definitive treatment was initiaited.  In 17% of their study group of 66 patients, surgery was recommended on a different anatomic site.  Once the correct diagnosis was made and the hip arthroscopy was performed, 89% of the patients were clinically better off than before surgery.  That is positive.

Hip pain can originate from a number of structures and as a result can be easily misdiagnosed.  Low back pain can refer pain to the hip area.  Sacroiliac joint dysfunction can too.  Hip pain can be due to bony problems such as impingement or due to damage to the cartilage structure around the socket, that is the labrum (similar to the shoulder – see an earlier post on this blog).  It can originate from strain or tearing of the lignaments around the hip joint as well as from all the many muscles which control the hip joint.  In addition, pain may originate from the pubic area where the abdominal muscles and the hip adductors attach, commonly called athletic pubalgia or a sports hernia.  Finally, hip pain can be a consequence of referred pain from the leg.

Hip pain is typically localized to the groin area.  It may also be felt laterally over the outside of the hip or in the buttock.  There may be clicking, popping and snapping in the hip joint associated with the pain.  Walking, running, ascending and descending stairs, putting shoes on (figure 4 sitting) and lying on the affected side may be challenging.

Your to do list:

  1. If you have back pain that radiates to the hip area (buttock, side of your leg, groin) ask your doctor or physical therapist to evaluate the hip.  At Custom Physical Therapy we check the hip with every low back pain patient so we do not miss the diagnosis.
  2. Educate yourself on the hip so you can ask questions of your doctor and physical therapist.  Do not let your hip pain get misdiagnosed and take 21 months to be correctly treated.
  3. Call us at Custom Physical Therapy if you have any questions regarding your hip pain.  Mention you are calling with specific questions regarding this post on hip pain.  We can answer your questions.
  4. There are some really top notch hip doctors in Reno, Nevada.  Call us if you want to know who they are.
  5. Please forward this on to your friends, family and coworkers via email, Facebook, Twitter or word of mouth.

Thank you for being part of Custom Physical Therapy.  Here’s to your healthy hips!

Physical therapy

Pain? What is it really?


The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as follows:

“Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential damage, or described in terms of such damage.”

So what does that mean anyway?

  1. Pain doesn’t feel good.
  2. Pain is influenced by our emotional status.
  3. There may or may not be any trauma to the body.

Put differently, per Dr. Lorimer Moseley, Ph.D., a world-renowned pain researcher and clinician at the Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute in Sydney, Australia:

“Pain is the conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue.”

Huh?!

This suggests that pain does not originate in the tissue due to injury or a degenerative process.  Instead, it is a very complex interaction between the peripheral tissues (e.g. torn muscle, knee arthritis, lumbar disc herniation, whiplash injury, broken bone) and the brain. The brain processes information as follows:

  1. From your experiences in life – how did your family deal with pain when you were growing up?
  2. Cultural factors – Italian men have been shown to be stimulated by a blue placebo pill and sedated by a red one while men of other cultures in the study experienced the opposite.
  3. Social and work environments – if you enjoy your job and like your boss then less pain may be experienced than if you don’t.
  4. Your expectations as to what might happen as a consequence of the pain – if you do not have an adequate understanding of a particular injury you have sustained you might be concerned as to how you will return to work or your hobby/sport and thus experience more pain.

So pain is an output from the brain after the brain has processed all the above information as well as the nerve impulses coming from the injured area, called sensory input.  Once it has synthesized the need for an output you will then “be told by your brain” if something is painful or not. Think about the person I spoke to a few years ago who had a motor cycle accident and felt minimal pain when she stopped skidding along the highway and noticed her leg 20 feet away from her!  Why no pain then? The brain had compiled an appropriate response at that time that suggested she had more important survival needs and thus did not feel pain. When she was loaded into the ambulance and the emergency personnel took over (they were in charge of survival now) she began to feel pain.

So what kind of output from the brain results once it has decided there needs to be a response to the “painful situation?”

  1. Pain is produced which makes us do something to address the “dangerous”  position we are in.
  2. The sympathetic nervous system causes the fight or flight reflex.  Increases in heart rate occur.  Energy systems are stimulated.  We sweat. We are ready to take evasive action!
  3. Muscles are reactive and are set to fight or run away as well as protect the damaged area. If you have torn a hamstring muscle you know you cannot move due to spasms – a physiological brace per se!
  4. The endocrine system is mobilized and in so doing hormones circulate in the blood stream to help mobilize energy for use by the muscles and reduce other nonessential body functions such as intestinal motility.

The most recent research into pain has changed the viewpoint from one of a noxious stimulus causing pain (i.e. a peripheral origin of pain) to one of the brain being the decision maker as to what is painful and what is not (i.e. a central origin of pain). How complicated is that! It is not as simple as treating the injured tissue to relieve the pain. Pain needs to be treated from multiple angles with a multi-disciplinary approach.

YOU CALL TO ACTION!

  1. Check out Dr. Lorimer Moseley’s blog at : http://bodyinmind.org/resources/journal-articles/full-text-articles/reconceptualising-pain-according-to-modern-pain-science/
  2. What do you think of this new concept of how pain is generated? Post your ideas on this blog for others to read.
  3. Invite a friend who is struggling with pain to read this.
  4. Call us at any of our three clinics if you have any questions:

Sparks location: 775-331-1199

South Reno location: 775-853-9966

Northwest location: 775-746-9222