Custom Physical Therapy looking for a Physical Therapist.


Custom Physical Therapy is seeking an outdoorsy, mountain biking, hiking, Lake Tahoe loving, skiing, camping, life loving outpatient orthopedic physical therapist to join us in Reno, Nevada.


We love what we do and are expanding because of the experiences our patients have and the absolutely amazing people who work at Custom Physical Therapy. Yes, I am biased but it’s totally true.


If you are a PT or know of someone who is a PT or a new grad and may be interested in working with us, contact me at (775) 813-2332 or ameintjes@usphclinic.com.

I’d love to chat with you.

André

(Aka owner/physical therapist/chief goofball)

Battling El Nino with Your Core in 10 minutes.


El Nino is arriving with massive amounts of snow and rain, right? We all hope for drought relief but with the forecasted “big winter” comes the need for strength and control of your hidden muscles to weather (pun intended) the wet, cold, white, slippery Reno-Sparks-Lake Tahoe area.

A generally accepted definition of “the core” is the muscles from below the neck and above the upper thigh (shoulders to hips). The importance of these muscles is in injury prevention, maintaining erect, “regal” posture and providing a base for functional strength (the ability to push a heavy door open, get in and out of a car, stand up out of a chair or lift a box form the floor to a counter). Training all the core would take all day if you try to isolate each muscle individually. So, do 3 exercises and get nearly all of them done in less than 10 minutes!

“YTWL” – shoulder and back muscles.

Keeping your body straight over a therapy ball beneath your lower abdominal-pelvic area and feet against the wall, raise your arms in 4 different planes noted by “YTWL”. Arms overhead at a 45° angle between head and shoulders, in line with shoulders, elbows tucked into your sides flexed 90°, and finally rotation of shoulders up with upper arms at shoulder level. No therapy ball? Just do it off the corner of your bed.

The Y of the YTWL Series

The Y of the YTWL Series (see YouTube channel for video)

Front Plank – abdominals, butt and shoulder.

Lying prone, support your body in a straight line from shoulders to ankles resting on your elbows and toes. Pull your navel in and up (“make yourself skinny”) and pinch your glutes together while rounding out your shoulders. Hold this position for up to a minute (must have perfect technique the entire hold). Repeat three to five times.

Front plank

Front plank (see YouTube channel for video)

Clamshell Progression – Hip muscles.

Lay on your side, knees bent to 90° and hips at 45°, one leg atop the other. Rotate your hip out by lifting your top knee while keeping feet together, 10 times. Rotate foot up keeping thighs together 10 times. Lift top leg parallel to bottom and rotate 10 times around the axis of the femur. Straighten your hip, keeping knee at 90° and rotate 10 times around the femurs axis. Tough people, repeat 3 times on each side.

Clamshell # 4

Clamshell # 4 (see YouTube channel for video)

To see a video of each exercise on our YouTube channel, go to The El Nino Core Program .

El Nino dump your snow, your rain and whatever icy weather you care to bring us. Our core is now ready for shoveling snow, lifting and carrying sand bags (hope not!) and preventing falls when slipping on ice. Bring on those pressure changes that make my back ache – El Nino we got the work done before you came!. See you when you arrive, that’s if you don’t chicken out again!

Reasons to Choose Custom Physical Therapy


It is not osteoporosis that causes fractures.


We all know someone who has had a bone mineral density test and been diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis.  This means they have lower than normal bone mineral density and hence their bones may be more fragile.  This in itself does not necessarily cause fractures but does need to be addressed.

A comprehensive, multifaceted approach to the treatment of osteopenia and osteoporosis will have a significant impact on bone density.  Clearly there are suitable medications one can take which your physician can address (beyond my scope of practice for sure).  I am sure you have all seen the numerous commercials on TV for these medications with that classic … “Ask your doctor about Boniva (or whatever medication they are advertising)” at the end.

The predictive value of bone mineral density measurements has been called into question in that it can under or overestimate density by 20% to 50%.  If it underestimates the density of the bone, you may receive unnecessary treatment.  If it overestimates bone mineral density you may not receive the most effective treatment.  So, what should you do?

Recognize that it is the fall that causes fractures and not the osteoporosis or osteopenia.  So if you address the physical limitations causing falls you will reduce the frequency of falls and thus reduce fractures.  75% of fractures occur in people without osteoporosis.  80% of low impact fractures occur in people who do not have osteoporosis.  Yes, it is the falls.

Preventing falls among older adults reduces the incidence of fractures, sometimes by over 50%.  Scientific evidence supports a reduction in fall frequency through strength and balance training, followed by reductions in the number of psychotropic drugs, dietary supplementation with Vitamin D and calcium and, in high risk populations, assessment and modification of home hazards.

This is where physical therapy is involved.  A fall prevention program should include targeted strengthening and stretching, static and dynamic balance training, posture modification, home hazard removal and of course an ongoing home exercise program which should be completed on a daily basis.

How do you know if you, a friend or a family member may need a fall prevention (and hence fracture prevention) program?  Answer “YES” to one of the questions below and you should consult with a physical therapist.

  1. Do you have difficulty going from a sitting to a standing position?
  2. Have you fallen without a known precipitating event?
  3. Have you fallen more than once in the past 6 months?
  4. Does it take you longer than 13 seconds to get up from a seated position and walk 10 feet?
  5. Do you have osteopenia or osteoporosis?
  6. Are you unsure if you would benefit from a fall prevention program?

Do your own assessment and decide if you, a family member or a friend may need to address balance issues with a physical therapist.  You will be glad you did.